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College Catalog Fall 2010 - Spring 2011
Computer Aided Drafting and Design - AAS, AOS

The Field

Computer aided drafting and design (CADD) is a vital part of every field where design activities occur and where technical drawings are required. It is used extensively in mechanical, electrical, industrial, architectural, and civil applications, and in many subsets of these such as landscape design, automotive design, fashion design, etc. In the past 15 years, CADD has revolutionized industry's methods of doing design work and producing technical documentation.

The Instructional Program

The Computer Aided Drafting and Design program offers two associate-degree options: the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) and the Associate in Occupational Studies (A.O.S.). The technical CADD content of each is identical, and both are equally effective in securing employment. The A.A.S. option has a few more liberal arts and science courses and is appropriate for students who plan on transferring to a four-year school. The first semester of each option is identical so that students can enter either and then switch if desired after the first semester. Both degree options emphasize mechanical drafting and design during the first year, and electronic drafting and design during the second. The focus of the CADD courses is on the production of industry-quality technical designs and drawings.

Two one-year certificate programs are also available: CAD Mechanical and CAD Electronic. Essentially, they are the first and second years of the A.O.S. degree option, and a student who completes a certificate can use all of the credits toward the A.O.S. degree.

Entrance Requirements

Students from a wide range of backgrounds have been successful in these degree programs. The mathematics requirements are flexible and can be geared to the needs of the individual. It is not necessary to have had drafting courses in high school, but it is helpful. The minimum entrance requirement is high school graduation, but successful completion of courses in mathematics, drafting, and keyboarding increase a student's chance of success. A mechanical or graphics aptitude and a willingness to work are probably the best predictors of success. Students who plan to transfer to a four-year Engineering Technology program should take as much mathematics and science as possible in high school. Students from CADD programs at BOCES are usually well equipped to enter the program and may take advantage of the articulation program described below.

High School Articulation

The CADD program at SUNY Delhi has been a statewide leader in developing Tech-Prep CADD articulation agreements with high school technology programs and BOCES centers. It is possible for a high school student to earn up to 15 college credits towards the CADD associate degree while still in high school. The credits are granted after a student successfully completes the first semester of the CADD program at Delhi. These agreements are advantageous to students in that they eliminate redundant coursework and make the transition to college more efficient. Students interested in this program should contact their high school Technology Department or their BOCES CADD instructor.

Advanced Placement

Advanced placement means that a student bypasses the first year of the CADD program and enters directly into the second. This is often appropriate for students from BOCES CADD programs (two years) and others who have had industrial experience equivalent to the first year of the program. BOCES students with 15 hours of articulated credit (see above) often take this route and may earn an associate degree in only three semesters.

Career Options

The growth of this technology has produced a corresponding need for designers/drafters who know both CADD software and the technical design factors of a particular field. The role of these designers/drafters is to translate the ideas and concepts of inventors and engineers into graphical designs required for the production of an end product.

A graduate of SUNY Delhi's CADD program has a number of career options. One is employment as a CADD designer/drafter, a career that can be rewarding in itself, or as a stepping stone to other technical and managerial positions. A second option is transfer to a four-year bachelor-degree program in one of the Engineering Technologies. A third option is transfer to a bachelor-degree program in Industrial or Technical Education in preparation for a career as a technical teacher in public schools.

CADD graduates possess very saleable skills after two years of college, and these skills can be used as the basis for a number of different careers related to computer graphics.

Curriculum

SUNY Curriculum Code:  1043

First Semester

Course No.

Course                                       

Cr. Hrs.

 CADD 111

Fundamentals of Drafting

3

 CADD 112

Dimensioning and Tolerancing 

 3 

 CADD 113

Descriptive Geometry

3

 CADD 130

Introduction to CAD

3

 MATH ___

Mathematics1

3-4

 

Total

15-16

Second Semester

Course No.

Course                                       

Cr. Hrs.

 CADD 151

Production Drawings

3

 CADD 152

Geometric Form Tolerances

4

 CADD 153

Industrial Drawings

3

 CADD 170

Manufacturing Processes

3

 MATH ___

Mathematics1

3-4

 

Total                                      

16-17

Third Semester

Course No.

Course                                      

Cr. Hrs.

 CADD 215

Electrical and Electronic Diagrams 

 3 

 CADD 225

Electro-Mechanical Design

3

 CADD 230

Electricity

3

 CADD 240

CAD II (AUTOCAD)

3

 MATH ___

Mathematics1 or Technical Elective 

 3-4 

 

Total

15-16

Fourth Semester

Course No.

Course                                     

Cr. Hrs.

 CADD 255

Printed Circuit Design

4

 CADD 270

Electronics

3

 AECT 150

Statics and Strengths of Materials 

3

 ____ ___

Communications/English2

3

 ____ ___

Mathematics1 or Technical Elective 

3-4 

 

Total

16-17

Degree Requirement: 62 credit hours

Notes

1 Mathematics by advisement. MATH 128 College Algebra and MATH 138 Trigonometry are the minimum exit-level mathematics requirement for this program. Students with appropriate math backgrounds will be placed in higher-level mathematics courses.

2 Communications or English by advisement.

Admissions Requirements

High school graduate with a minimum 73% overall average or a minimum 2500 GED test score. A 70% or higher on the Math A Regents exam is required for the A.A.S. degree only, and a keyboarding class is strongly recommended.

Electives

Technical Electives

Course No.

Course                                             

Cr. Hrs.

 ARCH 110

Computer-Aided Residential Drawing 

4

 CITA 110

Introduction to Software Applications 

 3 

 CITA 120

Computer Concepts and Operation Systems 

3

 EGSC 140

Introduction to GIS  

3

 LARC 110

Drawing and Surveying  

3

 LARC 120

Landscape Graphics           

2

Program Objectives

A graduate of the CADD A.A.S. or A.O.S. program should be able to:

  1. Delineate various mechanical types of parts by following the industry standard, ASME Y14.5M, as it relates to line quality, lettering, geometric constructions, multiview drawings (orthographic projection), and sectioning.
  2. Detail various mechanical types of parts by following the ASME Y14.5M standard as it relates to dimensioning and tolerancing.
  3. Detail various mechanical types of parts by following the ASME Y14.5M standard as it relates to descriptive geometry, theory of projection, and auxiliary views.
  4. Learn and master the use of at least two different types of computer-based 3-D graphic software, one in the first year (CADKEY) and a different one in the second year (AutoCAD), to generate and create electronic files as well as printed/plotted sets of working drawings that conform to the ASME Y14.5M standard.
  5. Detail complete sets of working drawings by following the ASME Y14.5M standard for the development, production, and/or servicing of various types of mechanical systems.
  6. Detail drawings that relate to the areas of welded fabricated parts, piping, hydraulics, pneumatics, structural, and developments by conforming to various industry standards.
  7. Understand and know how to use and apply geometric form tolerances and true positioning by following the ASME Y14.5M standard.
  8. Resource and use both electronic and printed manufacturing manuals.
  9. Specify commonly used materials in making various types of parts based on a knowledge of cast, forged, stamped, machined, extruded, and other manufacturing processing methods. 
  10. Demonstrate a working knowledge of electricity and electronics.
  11. Detail complete sets of working drawings as they relate to the electro-mechanical field and design simple electronic packages given a schematic and electrical parts list.
  12. Detail complete sets of working drawings as they relate to the electronics industry.
  13. Design single- and double-sided printed circuit boards given a schematic or logic diagram.
  14. Design products using parametric solid modeling software.

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Last Updated: 1/8/10