College Catalog Fall 2016 - Spring 2017

Residential Construction - AOS and AAS

The Instructional Program

These programs place their emphasis on the hand skills and techniques used in residential construction. These programs have a theoretical side as well, but their primary objective is to educate skilled craftsmen and craftswomen. Students in these programs have regular assignments on actual job sites where they learn "on the job." The programs are designed for employment, as well as for someone who wishes to start their own residential construction, remodeling, or woodworking business.

Delhi offers two associate's degrees in this area:

  • the AOS degree in Residential Construction (curriculum contains one math course, and is primarily aimed at employment)
  • the AAS degree in Residential Construction (curriculum contains liberal arts, math, and science courses, and lends itself to employment and/or entry into an advanced degree program)

Transfer Options

The AAS degree in Residential Construction gives students the opportunity to either enter the workforce or continue in a bachelor's degree program at SUNY Delhi - the Bachelor of Technology (BT degree) in Construction Management. This four-year degree program is in a 2+2 format with the AAS degree, so students who successfully complete the AAS degree can apply for admission to the BT program and, if qualified, continue their studies at the next level.

Minimum Requirements to be Considered for Admission

AOS Residential Construction

Freshman:

  • high school graduate with 70 high school GPA or 2500 GED test score
  • Algebra Regents recommended: 65

Transfer Student:

  • Transfer GPA 2.0

AAS Residential Construction

Freshman:

  • high school graduate with 75 high school GPA or 2500 GED test score
  • Algebra Regents: 70

Transfer Student:

  • Transfer GPA 2.0

CURRICULUM:

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION AOS
RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION AAS

 
RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION AOS
SUNY Curriculum Code: 0503

SUNY General Education Requirements: Students who intend to receive AA, AS, or baccalaureate degrees must satisfy SUNY and campus General Education (GE) requirements to graduate. Students should be aware that GE requirements may vary by academic program. Consult with your academic advisor. For general information, see the "General Education" section of this catalog.

AAS and AOS degree students may not be required to fulfill General Education (GE) requirements; however, any student who may wish to transfer should complete as many GE courses as possible. Consult with your academic advisor.

Technical Standards: In addition to academic requirements, all applicants must also be able to meet the minimum Technical Standards for the program, with or without reasonable accommodation.

Academic Requirements: There are three advisement options. The first-year coursework is the same for all three options. The second-year courses are shown separately for each option.

Minimum Total Credit Hours = 61 (for the Remodeling-Masonry option); 62 (for the Remodeling Cabinetmaking and the Woodworking-Cabinetmaking options)

Major Courses Required for the AOS First Year - 28 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
ARCH 110 Computer-Aided Residential Drawings 3
CARP 120 Construction Plans and Specifications 3
CARP 130 Light Frame Construction Theory 3
CARP 140 Light Frame Construction Laboratory 4
CARP 150 Finish Carpentry 3
CARP 160 Finish Carpentry Lab 4
CARP 170 Construction Estimating 3
CARP 240 Advanced Framing Principles 3
TECH 115 OSHA 30 Construction Safety 2

General Education/Liberal Arts Courses Required for the AOS First Year - 3 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
MATH 102 Mathematics for Applied Technology* 3

Note

*MATH 102 Mathematics for Applied Technology is the minimum exit-level math requirement for the AOS degree.

Courses Required for the AOS Second Year:

Option 1: Remodeling-Masonry

Major Courses Required for the AOS Second Year - 28 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
CARP 180 Energy-Efficient Construction 3
CARP 190 Construction Employment Skills 3
CARP 210 Residential Remodeling Theory 3
CARP 220 Residential Remodeling Laboratory 4
CARP 290 Mechanical Systems 2
MASN 110 Masonry Fundamentals 3
MASN 150 Finish Masonry 3
MASN 160 Finish Masonry Laboratory 4
MASN 170 Foundation Design 3

Restricted Electives by advisement - 2 credit hours

Option 2: Remodeling-Cabinetmaking

Major Courses Required for the AOS Second Year - 28 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
CARP 190 Construction Employment Skills 3
CARP 210 Residential Remodeling Theory 3
CARP 220 Residential Remodeling Laboratory 4
CARP 290 Mechanical Systems 2
WDWK 110 Basic Woodworking Theory 3
WDWK 210 Cabinet Construction Theory 3
WDWK 220 Cabinet Construction Laboratory 4
WDWK 230 Residential Millwork 3

Restricted Electives by Advisement - 3 credit hours

Option 3: Woodworking-Cabinetmaking

Major Courses Required for the AOS Second Year - 26 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
CARP 180 Energy-Efficient Construction 3
WDWK 110 Basic Woodworking Theory 3
WDWK 120 Basic Woodworking Laboratory 4
WDWK 130 Cabinet Design and Joinery 3
WDWK 140 Woodcarving 3
WDWK 210 Cabinet Construction Theory 3
WDWK 220 Cabinet Construction Laboratory 4
WDWK 230 Residential Millwork 3

Restricted Electives by Advisement - 5 credit hours

Student Learning Outcomes for the AOS Degree

Following is a list of student learning outcomes outcomes for the Residential Construction program. The outcomes addressed in the coursework vary slightly depending on which option is chosen.

Semester 1

  • Tool proficiency - Students should be able to correctly identify by name and select the tool that best satisfies a given task, and use the tool in the manner for which it was intended.
  • Safety - Students should be able to correctly identify potential dangerous situations on the job site/laboratory as well as identify dangers presented in different scenarios, such as through various types of media or orally. Students should also be able to offer OSHA approved methods of addressing given situations. Students should be able to demonstrate and/or describe correct and safe uses of typical job site equipment such as ladders, scaffolding, power tool, hand tools, and personal protective equipment.
  • Floor layout/construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify and accurately lay out the framing members necessary to construct a floor system. Students should also able to physically cut the components and, using a team approach, assemble the floor system. The layout and assembly will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Wall layout/construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify the wall type, and then accurately lay out the framing members necessary to construct a wall system. Students should also be able to physically cut the components and, using a team approach, assemble the wall system. The layout and construction will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Rafter layout/roof construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify roof components, accurately calculate dimensions of various types of rafters, and lay out the rafters. Students should also be able to physically cut the rafters and, using a team approach, assemble the roof structure. The layout and construction will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Blueprint interpretation - Students should be able to correctly identify and interpret the necessary information found on blueprints and specification sheets. Interpretation should be thorough and specific to given situations, and proficiency should include the various types of views. Necessary information includes: material type, dimensions, placement, and orientation.

Semester 2

  • Roofing application - Students should be able to identify components by name and correctly install various types of sheathing, roofing, flashing, and waterproofing details; this includes correct placement of necessary scaffolding/staging/fall protection to safely complete the job. The installation will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Siding application - Students should be able to identify components by name and correctly install various types of sheathing, siding, flashing, and waterproofing details; this includes correct placement of the necessary scaffolding/staging to safely complete the job. The siding installation will have to be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Door/window installation - Students should be able to identify door/window components and hardware. Student should also be able to install the door/window, hardware, flashing, and trim within specific tolerances, as well as meet the building code requirements.
  • Interior finishes and moldings - Students should be able to identify, select, and install various wall and ceiling finishes, as well as moldings and flooring. Products should be installed to within specific tolerances.
  • Stair calculation - Given a blueprint or a scenario, students should be able to calculate and lay out a stair stringer within specific tolerances. Students should also be able to identify, cut, assemble, and install the stair and balustrade components, and do so while meeting building code requirements.
  • Estimating proficiency - Given a blueprint and cost sheet, students should be able to estimate various quantities of materials necessary for the completion of a given job or portion of a job. Estimates will have to be performed within specific tolerances.
  • Energy - Students should be able to accurately apply the NYS Energy Code to various residential applications and perform heat loss calculations within specific tolerances. Students should also identify and solve problems related to moisture issues and insulation problems, and demonstrate an understanding of residential solar issues.

Semester 3

  • Foundation calculation - Given a blueprint or a job site situation, students should be able to determine the exact depth and location to where a footing should be placed in order to build a foundation wall. The top of the wall will need to be located at a specific elevation when completed. Students will be expected to adhere to specific tolerances as well as meet building code requirements.
  • Dormer layout - Given a blueprint of an existing building, students should be able to calculate, lay out and/or build different types of dormers to specific tolerances.
  • Kitchen layout - Given a simulated remodeling project, students should be able to identify components, plan, design, and estimate the materials necessary to complete a bathroom and a kitchen remodeling project. Projects should be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Mechanicals - Students should acquire a working knowledge of correct installation procedures for plumbing and electrical systems within a residential environment. Students are expected to demonstrate these skills along with fixture installation proficiency. Physical work is expected to be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Employment Skills - Students should acquire a working knowledge of common business structures, including: sole proprietorship, partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Students should be also able to identify basic management techniques needed to start-up, operate, and maintain a construction business, including: credit and financing, insurance requirements, tax filing, profits and losses, marketing, work crew leadership, and contract issues. Students will improve written and oral communication skills through presentations and written assignments.
  • Hand tool and shop tool proficiency, maintenance, and safety - Students should be able to identify by name and select the hand/shop tool that best satisfies a given task, and use the tool safely and proficiently in the manner for which it was intended. Students should also be able to perform minor repairs and adjustments to the shop tools.
  • Cabinetmaking construction - Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to view a plan (such as a table with drawer) and safely perform all of the necessary operations to accurately build and finish the project. Students will build and finish several different projects and be expected to do so to specific tolerances.
  • Plan, design, and interpretation of working drawing - Students should be able demonstrate the ability to interpret plans, make design changes when asked, devise a plan of procedure, and execute the plan to specific tolerances.

Semester 4

  • Masonry general - Students should be able to correctly identify various masonry components as well as mixture ratios for making concrete and mortar. Students should also be able to accurately estimate quantities necessary to complete given projects.
  • Masonry hand skills - Students should be able to demonstrate a variety of hand skills necessary to build projects involving concrete, mortar, concrete block, and brick. Project work may include many different types of materials and take place on different surfaces. Students should be able to perform the work on the projects within specific tolerances as well as meet building code requirements.
  • Foundation design - Given a specific set of conditions, students should be able to design various types of foundations within the parameters of the building code. Students should be able to discuss advantages and disadvantages, perform cost analysis, and discuss quality differences. Students should have a working knowledge of Radon gas issues and strategies to address them.
  • Creating curved moldings/surfaces - Given a project that involves manufacturing curved moldings or curved surfaces, students should be able to select from a variety of materials and techniques a method of producing the product necessary to satisfy the project. Students should also be able to discuss advantages and disadvantages of potential techniques to be used. All work should be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Computer drafting competency - Students should be able to demonstrate competency in producing a computer aided drawing of a house/structure floor plan. Plans must include all appropriate symbols, dimensions, and various views necessary for construction. This project and others leading to it should be performed to specific tolerances.
  • Long term cabinetmaking project - Students should be able to develop a long term (more complex) plan, estimate the quantities of materials necessary as well as select and purchase the materials. Finally, students will build the project to exact standards. Students will track estimated costs/labor versus actual costs/labor through the use of a project journal.

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RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION AAS

SUNY Curriculum Code: 1392

SUNY General Education Requirements: Students who intend to receive AA, AS, or baccalaureate degrees must satisfy SUNY and campus General Education (GE) requirements to graduate. Students should be aware that GE requirements may vary by academic program. Consult with your academic advisor. For general information, see the "General Education" section of this catalog.

AAS and AOS degree students may not be required to fulfill General Education (GE) requirements; however, any student who may wish to transfer should complete as many GE courses as possible. Consult with your academic advisor.

Technical Standards: In addition to academic requirements, all applicants must also be able to meet the minimum Technical Standards for the program, with or without reasonable accommodation.

Academic Requirements: There are three advisement options. First-year courses are the same for all three options. Second-year courses are shown separately for each option.

Minimum Total Credit Hours = 64

FIRST YEAR

Major Courses Required - 19 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
CARP 120 Construction Plans and Specifications 3
CARP 130 Light Frame Construction Theory 3
CARP 140 Light Frame Construction Laboratory 4
CARP 150 Finish Carpentry 3
CARP 160 Finish Carpentry Lab 4
TECH 115 OSHA 30 Construction 2

General Education/Liberal Arts Courses Required - 12 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
ENGL 100 Freshman Composition 3
MATH 128 College Algebra* 3
MATH 138 Trigonometry* 3
  Elective from GE4 or GE5 3

Note

*MATH 128 College Algebra and MATH 138 Trigonometry are the minimum exit-level mathematics requirement for the AAS degree.

SECOND YEAR

General Education/Liberal Arts Courses Required - 10 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
COMM 100 Public Speaking  
  OR 3
ENGL 200 Advanced Composition  
PHYS 150 General Physics I  
  OR 4
SCIE 125 Exploring Physical Science Applications  
  Elective with LASC attribute
 
  OR  
ECON 100 Introductory Macroeconomics 3
  OR  
ECON 110 Introductory Microeconomics  

 

Major Courses Required for Option 1: Remodeling-Masonry - 23 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
ARCH 110 Computer-Aided Residential Drawings 3
CARP 210 Residential Remodeling Theory 3
CARP 180 Energy-Efficient Construction  
  OR 3
AECT 150 Statics and Strengths of Materials  
CARP 220 Residential Remodeling Laboratory 4
MASN 110 Masonry Fundamentals 3
MASN 150 Finish Masonry 3
MASN 160 Finish Masonry Laboratory 4

 

Major Courses Required for Option 2: Remodeling/Woodworking - 23 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
ARCH 110 Computer-Aided Residential Drawings 3
CARP 180 Energy-Efficient Construction  
  OR 3
AECT 150 Statics and Strengths of Materials  
CARP 210 Residential Remodeling Theory 3
CARP 220 Residential Remodeling Laboratory 4
WDWK110 Basic Woodworking Theory 3
WDWK 210 Cabinet Construction Theory 3
WDWK 220 Cabinet Construction Laboratory 4

 

Major Courses Required for Option 3: Woodworking - 23 credit hours

Course No. Course Cr. Hrs.
ARCH 110 Computer-Aided Residential Drawings 3
CARP 180 Energy-Efficient Construction  
  OR 3
AECT 150 Statics and Strengths of Materials  
WDWK 110 Basic Woodworking Theory 3
WDWK 120 Basic Woodworking Laboratory 4
WDWK 130 Cabinet Design and Joinery 3
WDWK 210 Cabinet Construction Theory 3
WDWK 220 Cabinet Construction Laboratory 4

 

Student Learning Outcomes for the AAS Degree

Following is a list of student learning outcomes outcomes for the Residential Construction program. The outcomes addressed in the coursework vary slightly depending on which option is chosen.

Semester 1

  • Tool proficiency - Students should be able to correctly identify by name and select the tool that best satisfies a given task, and use the tool in the manner for which it was intended.
  • Safety - Students should be able to correctly identify potential dangerous situations on the job site/laboratory as well as identify dangers presented in different scenarios, such as through various types of media or orally. Students should also be able to offer OSHA approved methods of addressing given situations. Students should be able to demonstrate and/or describe correct and safe uses of typical job site equipment such as ladders, scaffolding, power tool, hand tools, and personal protective equipment.
  • Floor layout/construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify and accurately lay out the framing members necessary to construct a floor system. Students should also able to physically cut the components and, using a team approach, assemble the floor system. The layout and assembly will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Wall layout/construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify the wall type, and then accurately lay out the framing members necessary to construct a wall system. Students should also be able to physically cut the components and, using a team approach, assemble the wall system. The layout and construction will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Rafter layout/roof construction - Given a blueprint, students should be able to identify roof components, accurately calculate dimensions of various types of rafters, and lay out the rafters. Students should also be able to physically cut the rafters and, using a team approach, assemble the roof structure. The layout and construction will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Blueprint interpretation - Students should be able to correctly identify and interpret the necessary information found on blueprints and specification sheets. Interpretation should be thorough and specific to given situations, and proficiency should include the various types of views. Necessary information includes: material type, dimensions, placement, and orientation.

Semester 2

  • Roofing application - Students should be able to identify components by name and correctly install various types of sheathing, roofing, flashing, and waterproofing details; this includes correct placement of necessary scaffolding/staging/fall protection to safely complete the job. The installation will have to be completed to specific tolerances as well as within building code requirements.
  • Siding application - Students should be able to identify components by name and correctly install various types of sheathing, siding, flashing, and waterproofing details; this includes correct placement of the necessary scaffolding/staging to safely complete the job. The siding installation will have to be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Door/window installation - Students should be able to identify door/window components and hardware. Student should also be able to install the door/window, hardware, flashing, and trim within specific tolerances, as well as meet the building code requirements.
  • Interior finishes and moldings - Students should be able to identify, select, and install various wall and ceiling finishes, as well as moldings and flooring. Products should be installed to within specific tolerances.
  • Stair calculation - Given a blueprint or a scenario, students should be able to calculate and lay out a stair stringer within specific tolerances. Students should also be able to identify, cut, assemble, and install the stair and balustrade components, and do so while meeting building code requirements.
  • Estimating proficiency - Given a blueprint and cost sheet, students should be able to estimate various quantities of materials necessary for the completion of a given job or portion of a job. Estimates will have to be performed within specific tolerances.
  • Energy - Students should be able to accurately apply the NYS Energy Code to various residential applications and perform heat loss calculations within specific tolerances. Students should also identify and solve problems related to moisture issues and insulation problems, and demonstrate an understanding of residential solar issues.

Semester 3

  • Foundation calculation - Given a blueprint or a job site situation, students should be able to determine the exact depth and location to where a footing should be placed in order to build a foundation wall. The top of the wall will need to be located at a specific elevation when completed. Students will be expected to adhere to specific tolerances as well as meet building code requirements.
  • Dormer layout - Given a blueprint of an existing building, students should be able to calculate, lay out and/or build different types of dormers to specific tolerances.
  • Kitchen layout - Given a simulated remodeling project, students should be able to identify components, plan, design, and estimate the materials necessary to complete a bathroom and a kitchen remodeling project. Projects should be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Mechanicals - Students should acquire a working knowledge of correct installation procedures for plumbing and electrical systems within a residential environment. Students are expected to demonstrate these skills along with fixture installation proficiency. Physical work is expected to be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Employment Skills - Students should acquire a working knowledge of common business structures, including: sole proprietorship, partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Students should be also able to identify basic management techniques needed to start-up, operate, and maintain a construction business, including: credit and financing, insurance requirements, tax filing, profits and losses, marketing, work crew leadership, and contract issues. Students will improve written and oral communication skills through presentations and written assignments.
  • Hand tool and shop tool proficiency, maintenance, and safety - Students should be able to identify by name and select the hand/shop tool that best satisfies a given task, and use the tool safely and proficiently in the manner for which it was intended. Students should also be able to perform minor repairs and adjustments to the shop tools.
  • Cabinetmaking construction - Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to view a plan (such as a table with drawer) and safely perform all of the necessary operations to accurately build and finish the project. Students will build and finish several different projects and be expected to do so to specific tolerances.
  • Plan, design, and interpretation of working drawing - Students should be able demonstrate the ability to interpret plans, make design changes when asked, devise a plan of procedure, and execute the plan to specific tolerances.

Semester 4

  • Masonry general - Students should be able to correctly identify various masonry components as well as mixture ratios for making concrete and mortar. Students should also be able to accurately estimate quantities necessary to complete given projects.
  • Masonry hand skills - Students should be able to demonstrate a variety of hand skills necessary to build projects involving concrete, mortar, concrete block, and brick. Project work may include many different types of materials and take place on different surfaces. Students should be able to perform the work on the projects within specific tolerances as well as meet building code requirements.
  • Foundation design - Given a specific set of conditions, students should be able to design various types of foundations within the parameters of the building code. Students should be able to discuss advantages and disadvantages, perform cost analysis, and discuss quality differences. Students should have a working knowledge of Radon gas issues and strategies to address them.
  • Creating curved moldings/surfaces - Given a project that involves manufacturing curved moldings or curved surfaces, students should be able to select from a variety of materials and techniques a method of producing the product necessary to satisfy the project. Students should also be able to discuss advantages and disadvantages of potential techniques to be used. All work should be completed within specific tolerances.
  • Computer drafting competency - Students should be able to demonstrate competency in producing a computer aided drawing of a house/structure floor plan. Plans must include all appropriate symbols, dimensions, and various views necessary for construction. This project and others leading to it should be performed to specific tolerances.
  • Long term cabinetmaking project - Students should be able to develop a long term (more complex) plan, estimate the quantities of materials necessary as well as select and purchase the materials. Finally, students will build the project to exact standards. Students will track estimated costs/labor versus actual costs/labor through the use of a project journal.

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